Course1

LIVE REPLAY: How Ethics Rules Apply to Lawyers Outside of Law Practice

$89.00

Ethics rules are intended primarily to regulate lawyer acts when practicing law. But the rules do not always stop there. Lawyers can be held responsible and disciplined under ethics rules for things they do when acting outside of their practices. Lawyers may be disciplined under ethics rules for criminal conduct, including misdemeanors, entirely unrelated to their lawyerly conduct. They may be also be disciplined for any acts that involve dishonesty, misrepresentation, or any actions prejudicial to the judicial system. This program will provide you with a guide to circumstances in which ethics rules apply to lawyers when they act outside of law practice.   Dishonesty and misrepresentation when a lawyer is acting as a non-lawyer Lawyers as business people – how counter-parties can allege ethical misconduct Self-representation – when lawyers represent themselves in litigation, who can they communicate with? Violations of law, including misdemeanors, as ethics violations Restrictions on lawyers’ ability to market themselves in non-lawyer roles   Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750-page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/10/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: How Ethics Rules Apply to Lawyers Outside of Law Practice

$89.00

Ethics rules are intended primarily to regulate lawyer acts when practicing law. But the rules do not always stop there. Lawyers can be held responsible and disciplined under ethics rules for things they do when acting outside of their practices. Lawyers may be disciplined under ethics rules for criminal conduct, including misdemeanors, entirely unrelated to their lawyerly conduct. They may be also be disciplined for any acts that involve dishonesty, misrepresentation, or any actions prejudicial to the judicial system. This program will provide you with a guide to circumstances in which ethics rules apply to lawyers when they act outside of law practice.   Dishonesty and misrepresentation when a lawyer is acting as a non-lawyer Lawyers as business people – how counter-parties can allege ethical misconduct Self-representation – when lawyers represent themselves in litigation, who can they communicate with? Violations of law, including misdemeanors, as ethics violations Restrictions on lawyers’ ability to market themselves in non-lawyer roles   Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750-page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/10/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Real Estate Finance: Trends and Best Practices, Part 1

$89.00

  This program will provide you with a guide to real estate finance. It will cover the practical aspects of structuring debt, equity, and mezzanine finance.  Major issues and traps in negotiating first mortgages, including personal guarantees and carve-outs, will be discussed in detail. The program will also cover credit enhancement, leasehold finance, and how financing alternatives have changed in a stronger market. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to major issues in negotiating and drafting real estate finance agreements.   Day 1: Major issues of negotiating first mortgages Loan application and bank commitments Role of personal guarantees and negotiating non-recourse carve-outs with lenders Defeasance and prepayment premiums   Day 2: Structuring equity in real estate deals Mezzanine financing and drafting issues Leasehold finance Credit enhancement instruments Single purpose entities for finance purposes   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/11/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Real Estate Finance: Trends and Best Practices, Part 1

$89.00

  This program will provide you with a guide to real estate finance. It will cover the practical aspects of structuring debt, equity, and mezzanine finance.  Major issues and traps in negotiating first mortgages, including personal guarantees and carve-outs, will be discussed in detail. The program will also cover credit enhancement, leasehold finance, and how financing alternatives have changed in a stronger market. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to major issues in negotiating and drafting real estate finance agreements.   Day 1: Major issues of negotiating first mortgages Loan application and bank commitments Role of personal guarantees and negotiating non-recourse carve-outs with lenders Defeasance and prepayment premiums   Day 2: Structuring equity in real estate deals Mezzanine financing and drafting issues Leasehold finance Credit enhancement instruments Single purpose entities for finance purposes   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/11/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Real Estate Finance: Trends and Best Practices, Part 2

$89.00

This program will provide you with a guide to real estate finance. It will cover the practical aspects of structuring debt, equity, and mezzanine finance.  Major issues and traps in negotiating first mortgages, including personal guarantees and carve-outs, will be discussed in detail. The program will also cover credit enhancement, leasehold finance, and how financing alternatives have changed in a stronger market. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to major issues in negotiating and drafting real estate finance agreements.   Day 1: Major issues of negotiating first mortgages Loan application and bank commitments Role of personal guarantees and negotiating non-recourse carve-outs with lenders Defeasance and prepayment premiums   Day 2: Structuring equity in real estate deals Mezzanine financing and drafting issues Leasehold finance Credit enhancement instruments Single purpose entities for finance purposes   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/12/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Real Estate Finance: Trends and Best Practices, Part 2

$89.00

This program will provide you with a guide to real estate finance. It will cover the practical aspects of structuring debt, equity, and mezzanine finance.  Major issues and traps in negotiating first mortgages, including personal guarantees and carve-outs, will be discussed in detail. The program will also cover credit enhancement, leasehold finance, and how financing alternatives have changed in a stronger market. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to major issues in negotiating and drafting real estate finance agreements.   Day 1: Major issues of negotiating first mortgages Loan application and bank commitments Role of personal guarantees and negotiating non-recourse carve-outs with lenders Defeasance and prepayment premiums   Day 2: Structuring equity in real estate deals Mezzanine financing and drafting issues Leasehold finance Credit enhancement instruments Single purpose entities for finance purposes   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/12/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Joint Ventures Agreements in Business, Part 1

$89.00

Businesses frequently pool their resources – capital, expertise, marketing, distribution – in joint ventures, leveraging their individual strengths by partnering with companies with complementary strengths. There are many types of JVs – contractual strategic alliances, entity-based ventures, and other hybrid forms – each with its tradeoffs.  JV agreements involve contributions by the parties, allocating management control, access to information, ownership of jointly developed property, dispute resolution, and transfers of interests. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning and drafting joint ventures. Day 1: Framework of considerations – formality, capital, tax issues, management control, exits Types of joint ventures – contractual strategic alliances v. shared entities v. hybrids Choice of entity – incorporated entities v. LPs and general partnerships v. LLCs Management, access to information, deadlocks and resolution Day 2:  Contributions – capital, marketing and distribution expertise, intangible assets Economics – allocation of profits and losses, and distribution policies Transfers of JV interests – rights of first offer/refusal, restrictions on transfers, dissolution Ownership of jointly developed property – development of intellectual Speaker: Peter J. Kinsella is a partner in the Denver office of Perkins Coie, LLP, where he has an extensive technology law practice focusing on advising start-up, emerging and large companies on technology-related commercial and intellectual property transaction matters.  Prior to joining his firm, he worked for ten years in various legal capacities with Qwest Communications International, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc.  Mr. Kinsella has extensive experience structuring and negotiating data sharing agreements, complex procurement agreements, product distribution agreements, OEM agreements, marketing and advertising agreements, corporate sponsorship agreements, and various types of patent, trademark and copyright licenses.  Mr. Kinsella received his B.S. from North Dakota State University and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/12/2022
    Avail. Until
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Course1

Joint Ventures Agreements in Business, Part 2

$89.00

  Businesses frequently pool their resources – capital, expertise, marketing, distribution – in joint ventures, leveraging their individual strengths by partnering with companies with complementary strengths. There are many types of JVs – contractual strategic alliances, entity-based ventures, and other hybrid forms – each with its tradeoffs.  JV agreements involve contributions by the parties, allocating management control, access to information, ownership of jointly developed property, dispute resolution, and transfers of interests. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning and drafting joint ventures.  Day 1: Framework of considerations – formality, capital, tax issues, management control, exits Types of joint ventures – contractual strategic alliances v. shared entities v. hybrids Choice of entity – incorporated entities v. LPs and general partnerships v. LLCs Management, access to information, deadlocks and resolution Day 2: Contributions – capital, marketing and distribution expertise, intangible assets Economics – allocation of profits and losses, and distribution policies Transfers of JV interests – rights of first offer/refusal, restrictions on transfers, dissolution Ownership of jointly developed property – development of intellectual Speaker: Peter J. Kinsella is a partner in the Denver office of Perkins Coie, LLP, where he has an extensive technology law practice focusing on advising start-up, emerging and large companies on technology-related commercial and intellectual property transaction matters.  Prior to joining his firm, he worked for ten years in various legal capacities with Qwest Communications International, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc.  Mr. Kinsella has extensive experience structuring and negotiating data sharing agreements, complex procurement agreements, product distribution agreements, OEM agreements, marketing and advertising agreements, corporate sponsorship agreements, and various types of patent, trademark and copyright licenses.  Mr. Kinsella received his B.S. from North Dakota State University and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School.    

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/13/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Equipment Leases: Drafting & UCC Article 2A Issues

$89.00

Many companies lease rather than buy computers and servers, company cars and other capital equipment.  These leases are government by UCC Article 2A, an intricate set of provisions governing their validity, treatment, and enforcement.  If the lease is not properly drafted to comply with the UCC, it risks being re-characterized as a sale or a security interest, which give rise to substantially adverse financial and tax consequences. This program will also provide you with a practical guide to reviewing equipment leases, including spotting red flags and avoiding recharacterization.   Types of equipment leases – “true” leases, synthetic leases, “lease to own” arrangements, and more Spotting red flags of financeable leases – and how to ensure UCC 2A compliance Rights and obligations of the parties – manufacturer, lessor and lessee – and remedies for breach Circumstances leading to re-characterization of a “true lease” as a sale or financing Adverse financial, tax and practical ramifications of lease re-characterization   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/15/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Equipment Leases: Drafting & UCC Article 2A Issues

$89.00

Many companies lease rather than buy computers and servers, company cars and other capital equipment.  These leases are government by UCC Article 2A, an intricate set of provisions governing their validity, treatment, and enforcement.  If the lease is not properly drafted to comply with the UCC, it risks being re-characterized as a sale or a security interest, which give rise to substantially adverse financial and tax consequences. This program will also provide you with a practical guide to reviewing equipment leases, including spotting red flags and avoiding recharacterization.   Types of equipment leases – “true” leases, synthetic leases, “lease to own” arrangements, and more Spotting red flags of financeable leases – and how to ensure UCC 2A compliance Rights and obligations of the parties – manufacturer, lessor and lessee – and remedies for breach Circumstances leading to re-characterization of a “true lease” as a sale or financing Adverse financial, tax and practical ramifications of lease re-characterization   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/15/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Joint Ventures Agreements in Business, Part 1

$89.00

Businesses frequently pool their resources – capital, expertise, marketing, distribution – in joint ventures, leveraging their individual strengths by partnering with companies with complementary strengths. There are many types of JVs – contractual strategic alliances, entity-based ventures, and other hybrid forms – each with its tradeoffs.  JV agreements involve contributions by the parties, allocating management control, access to information, ownership of jointly developed property, dispute resolution, and transfers of interests. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning and drafting joint ventures.   Day 1 – August 16, 2022: Framework of considerations – formality, capital, tax issues, management control, exits Types of joint ventures – contractual strategic alliances v. shared entities v. hybrids Choice of entity – incorporated entities v. LPs and general partnerships v. LLCs Management, access to information, deadlocks and resolution   Day 2 – August 17, 2022: Contributions – capital, marketing and distribution expertise, intangible assets Economics – allocation of profits and losses, and distribution policies Transfers of JV interests – rights of first offer/refusal, restrictions on transfers, dissolution Ownership of jointly developed property – development of intellectual   Speaker: Peter J. Kinsella is a partner in the Denver office of Perkins Coie, LLP, where he has an extensive technology law practice focusing on advising start-up, emerging and large companies on technology-related commercial and intellectual property transaction matters.  Prior to joining his firm, he worked for ten years in various legal capacities with Qwest Communications International, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc.  Mr. Kinsella has extensive experience structuring and negotiating data sharing agreements, complex procurement agreements, product distribution agreements, OEM agreements, marketing and advertising agreements, corporate sponsorship agreements, and various types of patent, trademark and copyright licenses.  Mr. Kinsella received his B.S. from North Dakota State University and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/16/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Joint Ventures Agreements in Business, Part 1

$89.00

Businesses frequently pool their resources – capital, expertise, marketing, distribution – in joint ventures, leveraging their individual strengths by partnering with companies with complementary strengths. There are many types of JVs – contractual strategic alliances, entity-based ventures, and other hybrid forms – each with its tradeoffs.  JV agreements involve contributions by the parties, allocating management control, access to information, ownership of jointly developed property, dispute resolution, and transfers of interests. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning and drafting joint ventures.   Day 1 – August 16, 2022: Framework of considerations – formality, capital, tax issues, management control, exits Types of joint ventures – contractual strategic alliances v. shared entities v. hybrids Choice of entity – incorporated entities v. LPs and general partnerships v. LLCs Management, access to information, deadlocks and resolution   Day 2 – August 17, 2022: Contributions – capital, marketing and distribution expertise, intangible assets Economics – allocation of profits and losses, and distribution policies Transfers of JV interests – rights of first offer/refusal, restrictions on transfers, dissolution Ownership of jointly developed property – development of intellectual   Speaker: Peter J. Kinsella is a partner in the Denver office of Perkins Coie, LLP, where he has an extensive technology law practice focusing on advising start-up, emerging and large companies on technology-related commercial and intellectual property transaction matters.  Prior to joining his firm, he worked for ten years in various legal capacities with Qwest Communications International, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc.  Mr. Kinsella has extensive experience structuring and negotiating data sharing agreements, complex procurement agreements, product distribution agreements, OEM agreements, marketing and advertising agreements, corporate sponsorship agreements, and various types of patent, trademark and copyright licenses.  Mr. Kinsella received his B.S. from North Dakota State University and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/16/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Joint Ventures Agreements in Business, Part 2

$89.00

Businesses frequently pool their resources – capital, expertise, marketing, distribution – in joint ventures, leveraging their individual strengths by partnering with companies with complementary strengths. There are many types of JVs – contractual strategic alliances, entity-based ventures, and other hybrid forms – each with its tradeoffs.  JV agreements involve contributions by the parties, allocating management control, access to information, ownership of jointly developed property, dispute resolution, and transfers of interests. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning and drafting joint ventures.   Day 1 – August 16, 2022: Framework of considerations – formality, capital, tax issues, management control, exits Types of joint ventures – contractual strategic alliances v. shared entities v. hybrids Choice of entity – incorporated entities v. LPs and general partnerships v. LLCs Management, access to information, deadlocks and resolution   Day 2 – August 17, 2022: Contributions – capital, marketing and distribution expertise, intangible assets Economics – allocation of profits and losses, and distribution policies Transfers of JV interests – rights of first offer/refusal, restrictions on transfers, dissolution Ownership of jointly developed property – development of intellectual   Speaker: Peter J. Kinsella is a partner in the Denver office of Perkins Coie, LLP, where he has an extensive technology law practice focusing on advising start-up, emerging and large companies on technology-related commercial and intellectual property transaction matters.  Prior to joining his firm, he worked for ten years in various legal capacities with Qwest Communications International, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc.  Mr. Kinsella has extensive experience structuring and negotiating data sharing agreements, complex procurement agreements, product distribution agreements, OEM agreements, marketing and advertising agreements, corporate sponsorship agreements, and various types of patent, trademark and copyright licenses.  Mr. Kinsella received his B.S. from North Dakota State University and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/17/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Joint Ventures Agreements in Business, Part 2

$89.00

Businesses frequently pool their resources – capital, expertise, marketing, distribution – in joint ventures, leveraging their individual strengths by partnering with companies with complementary strengths. There are many types of JVs – contractual strategic alliances, entity-based ventures, and other hybrid forms – each with its tradeoffs.  JV agreements involve contributions by the parties, allocating management control, access to information, ownership of jointly developed property, dispute resolution, and transfers of interests. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning and drafting joint ventures.   Day 1 – August 16, 2022: Framework of considerations – formality, capital, tax issues, management control, exits Types of joint ventures – contractual strategic alliances v. shared entities v. hybrids Choice of entity – incorporated entities v. LPs and general partnerships v. LLCs Management, access to information, deadlocks and resolution   Day 2 – August 17, 2022: Contributions – capital, marketing and distribution expertise, intangible assets Economics – allocation of profits and losses, and distribution policies Transfers of JV interests – rights of first offer/refusal, restrictions on transfers, dissolution Ownership of jointly developed property – development of intellectual   Speaker: Peter J. Kinsella is a partner in the Denver office of Perkins Coie, LLP, where he has an extensive technology law practice focusing on advising start-up, emerging and large companies on technology-related commercial and intellectual property transaction matters.  Prior to joining his firm, he worked for ten years in various legal capacities with Qwest Communications International, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc.  Mr. Kinsella has extensive experience structuring and negotiating data sharing agreements, complex procurement agreements, product distribution agreements, OEM agreements, marketing and advertising agreements, corporate sponsorship agreements, and various types of patent, trademark and copyright licenses.  Mr. Kinsella received his B.S. from North Dakota State University and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/17/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics and Conflicts with Clients, Part 1

$89.00

Despite best efforts, lawyers may develop ethical conflicts with their clients.  Sometimes these conflicts may initially seem like positive developments. The lawyer may seek to buy into a client’s business enterprise or participate in a transaction, be offered a gift by a client, or even develop a romantic relationship with a client.  But these and many others come with substantial ethical issues.  Sometimes these conflicts may be more immediately problematic, as when a lawyer leaves a law firm and wants to take his or her clients to the new firm, or when a client refuses to pay legal fees, or worse, as when the lawyer has a duty to disclose certain acts of his or her own malpractice.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to lawyer conflicts with their clients and how to avoid or resolve them. Day 1: Gifts – can lawyers accept from clients? Business – can lawyers go into business with a client? Departure – can lawyers take their clients to a firm? Former clients – what duties does a lawyer have? Day 2: Dishonest clients – what must you do? Lawyers as witnesses – how do you handle the conflict and privilege issues? Clients with diminished capacity – from whom do you take instructions?  What are the other issues? Settlements – what if a client’s tactics are improper? Malpractice – do you have a duty to disclose?   Speakers: William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/18/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics and Conflicts with Clients, Part 1

$89.00

Despite best efforts, lawyers may develop ethical conflicts with their clients.  Sometimes these conflicts may initially seem like positive developments. The lawyer may seek to buy into a client’s business enterprise or participate in a transaction, be offered a gift by a client, or even develop a romantic relationship with a client.  But these and many others come with substantial ethical issues.  Sometimes these conflicts may be more immediately problematic, as when a lawyer leaves a law firm and wants to take his or her clients to the new firm, or when a client refuses to pay legal fees, or worse, as when the lawyer has a duty to disclose certain acts of his or her own malpractice.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to lawyer conflicts with their clients and how to avoid or resolve them. Day 1: Gifts – can lawyers accept from clients? Business – can lawyers go into business with a client? Departure – can lawyers take their clients to a firm? Former clients – what duties does a lawyer have? Day 2: Dishonest clients – what must you do? Lawyers as witnesses – how do you handle the conflict and privilege issues? Clients with diminished capacity – from whom do you take instructions?  What are the other issues? Settlements – what if a client’s tactics are improper? Malpractice – do you have a duty to disclose?   Speakers: William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/18/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics and Conflicts with Clients, Part 2

$89.00

Despite best efforts, lawyers may develop ethical conflicts with their clients.  Sometimes these conflicts may initially seem like positive developments. The lawyer may seek to buy into a client’s business enterprise or participate in a transaction, be offered a gift by a client, or even develop a romantic relationship with a client.  But these and many others come with substantial ethical issues.  Sometimes these conflicts may be more immediately problematic, as when a lawyer leaves a law firm and wants to take his or her clients to the new firm, or when a client refuses to pay legal fees, or worse, as when the lawyer has a duty to disclose certain acts of his or her own malpractice.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to lawyer conflicts with their clients and how to avoid or resolve them. Day 1: Gifts – can lawyers accept from clients? Business – can lawyers go into business with a client? Departure – can lawyers take their clients to a firm? Former clients – what duties does a lawyer have? Day 2: Dishonest clients – what must you do? Lawyers as witnesses – how do you handle the conflict and privilege issues? Clients with diminished capacity – from whom do you take instructions?  What are the other issues? Settlements – what if a client’s tactics are improper? Malpractice – do you have a duty to disclose?   Speaker: William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/19/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics and Conflicts with Clients, Part 2

$89.00

Despite best efforts, lawyers may develop ethical conflicts with their clients.  Sometimes these conflicts may initially seem like positive developments. The lawyer may seek to buy into a client’s business enterprise or participate in a transaction, be offered a gift by a client, or even develop a romantic relationship with a client.  But these and many others come with substantial ethical issues.  Sometimes these conflicts may be more immediately problematic, as when a lawyer leaves a law firm and wants to take his or her clients to the new firm, or when a client refuses to pay legal fees, or worse, as when the lawyer has a duty to disclose certain acts of his or her own malpractice.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to lawyer conflicts with their clients and how to avoid or resolve them. Day 1: Gifts – can lawyers accept from clients? Business – can lawyers go into business with a client? Departure – can lawyers take their clients to a firm? Former clients – what duties does a lawyer have? Day 2: Dishonest clients – what must you do? Lawyers as witnesses – how do you handle the conflict and privilege issues? Clients with diminished capacity – from whom do you take instructions?  What are the other issues? Settlements – what if a client’s tactics are improper? Malpractice – do you have a duty to disclose?   Speaker: William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/19/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Selling to Consumers: Sales, Finance, Warranty & Collection Law, Part 1

$89.00

There is no larger market than sales of goods to consumers.  Though the opportunities for your clients are vast, selling to consumers is unlike selling to other businesses. Sales to consumers are governed by overlapping layers of regulations covering how those sales are financed, what warranties are implied by law versus expressly made by the seller, and – when need arises – debt collection of defaulted accounts. Failure to understand and comply with these layers of complexity can lead to consumer complaints and regulatory action, litigation and substantial liability. This program will provide you a framework for understanding the law of consumer sales, including financing those sales, express and implied warranties imposed by law, and debt collection from consumers.  Day 1: Essential law governing sales to consumers – sales law, finance, warranties Sales law – how consumer sales differ from commercial sales Consumer finance – securing the sales with collateral and anticipating defaults Role of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code and Reg Z Role of the new federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau   Day 2: Understanding the role of implied and express warranties in consumer sales under federal law Limiting a seller’s exposure to warranties and otherwise managing risk Overview Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and the Consumer Credit Protection Act Permissible debt collection practices in consumer sales and potential liability Communications with debtors and third parties and required disclosures Best practices to avoid liability for businesses, lawyers, and law firms   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/19/2022
    Avail. Until
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Course1

Selling to Consumers: Sales, Finance, Warranty & Collection Law, Part 2

$89.00

  There is no larger market than sales of goods to consumers.  Though the opportunities for your clients are vast, selling to consumers is unlike selling to other businesses. Sales to consumers are governed by overlapping layers of regulations covering how those sales are financed, what warranties are implied by law versus expressly made by the seller, and – when need arises – debt collection of defaulted accounts. Failure to understand and comply with these layers of complexity can lead to consumer complaints and regulatory action, litigation and substantial liability. This program will provide you a framework for understanding the law of consumer sales, including financing those sales, express and implied warranties imposed by law, and debt collection from consumers.  Day 1: Essential law governing sales to consumers – sales law, finance, warranties Sales law – how consumer sales differ from commercial sales Consumer finance – securing the sales with collateral and anticipating defaults Role of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code and Reg Z Role of the new federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau   Day 2: Understanding the role of implied and express warranties in consumer sales under federal law Limiting a seller’s exposure to warranties and otherwise managing risk Overview Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and the Consumer Credit Protection Act Permissible debt collection practices in consumer sales and potential liability Communications with debtors and third parties and required disclosures Best practices to avoid liability for businesses, lawyers, and law firms   Speakers:  Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law    

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/20/2022
    Avail. Until
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Escrow Agreements in Real Estate Transactions

$89.00

Escrow agreements are essential documents in every significant real estate transaction. They are mechanisms for allocating risk among the parties to the transaction.  Escrow agents are charged with determining whether certain contractual conditions are satisfied, thereby triggering the disbursement of money or property. Escrow arrangements mitigate the risk of non-performance by one of the parties.  But escrow agreements are fraught with potential conflicts and traps that may give rise to delays in finally closing a transaction. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting effective escrow agreements, risk allocation, conflict avoidance and working with escrow agents.   Essential terms – property held, conditions for release/disbursement, fees Defining an agent’s duties, authority, and liability Practical problems with escrow arrangements – holding all the documents, breaking escrow, death of party Issues in construction contracts, development transactions, and property sales Letter of credit, tax and bankruptcy issues to consider   Speaker: John S. Hollyfield is of counsel and a former partner in the Houston office Norton Rose Fulbright, LLP.  He has more than 40 years’ experience in real estate law practice.  He formerly served as chair of the ABA Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section, president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, and chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute.  He has been named a "Texas Super Lawyer" in Real Estate Law by Texas Monthly magazine and is listed in Who’s Who in American Law.  He is co-editor of Modern Banking and Lending Forms (4th Edition), published by Warren, Gorham & Lamont.  He received his B.B.A. from the University of Texas and his LL.B. from the University of Texas School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/22/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Escrow Agreements in Real Estate Transactions

$89.00

Escrow agreements are essential documents in every significant real estate transaction. They are mechanisms for allocating risk among the parties to the transaction.  Escrow agents are charged with determining whether certain contractual conditions are satisfied, thereby triggering the disbursement of money or property. Escrow arrangements mitigate the risk of non-performance by one of the parties.  But escrow agreements are fraught with potential conflicts and traps that may give rise to delays in finally closing a transaction. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting effective escrow agreements, risk allocation, conflict avoidance and working with escrow agents.   Essential terms – property held, conditions for release/disbursement, fees Defining an agent’s duties, authority, and liability Practical problems with escrow arrangements – holding all the documents, breaking escrow, death of party Issues in construction contracts, development transactions, and property sales Letter of credit, tax and bankruptcy issues to consider   Speaker: John S. Hollyfield is of counsel and a former partner in the Houston office Norton Rose Fulbright, LLP.  He has more than 40 years’ experience in real estate law practice.  He formerly served as chair of the ABA Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section, president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, and chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute.  He has been named a "Texas Super Lawyer" in Real Estate Law by Texas Monthly magazine and is listed in Who’s Who in American Law.  He is co-editor of Modern Banking and Lending Forms (4th Edition), published by Warren, Gorham & Lamont.  He received his B.B.A. from the University of Texas and his LL.B. from the University of Texas School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/22/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LLC/Partnerships Interests: Collateral, Pledges, and Security Interests

$89.00

LLC members, partners and S Corp shareholders frequently pledge their ownership stakes as collateral to fund their businesses or for personal purposes. Taking and perfecting a security interest in an ownership stake involves a complex set of choices and processes under UCC Article 9 and Article 8, federal securities law and organizational law, each implying risk and limitations on the secured party.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to taking and perfecting a security interest in a partnership, LLC or S Corp ownership stake, the practical remedies and choices available to secured parties on foreclosure, how to circumvent certain restrictions, and the impact of non-UCC law on taking a security interest.   How to take a security interest in partnership, LLC or S Corp ownership stake Relationship of Article 9 and Article 8, defining security interests in securities and investment properties Methods and mistakes in perfecting the security interest Restrictions on assignment and methods to circumvent Rights of secured parties, including the right buy, and foreclose strategies and traps Securities law and non-UCC legal issues   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/23/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LLC/Partnerships Interests: Collateral, Pledges, and Security Interests

$89.00

LLC members, partners and S Corp shareholders frequently pledge their ownership stakes as collateral to fund their businesses or for personal purposes. Taking and perfecting a security interest in an ownership stake involves a complex set of choices and processes under UCC Article 9 and Article 8, federal securities law and organizational law, each implying risk and limitations on the secured party.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to taking and perfecting a security interest in a partnership, LLC or S Corp ownership stake, the practical remedies and choices available to secured parties on foreclosure, how to circumvent certain restrictions, and the impact of non-UCC law on taking a security interest.   How to take a security interest in partnership, LLC or S Corp ownership stake Relationship of Article 9 and Article 8, defining security interests in securities and investment properties Methods and mistakes in perfecting the security interest Restrictions on assignment and methods to circumvent Rights of secured parties, including the right buy, and foreclose strategies and traps Securities law and non-UCC legal issues   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/23/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Letters of Intent in Real Estate Transactions

$89.00

Letters of intent in real estate transactions – buying/selling property and leasing – are essential in helping the parties frame areas of agreement, identify areas for further negotiation, and establish a timeline for completing the deal. These letters can also be cost-effective in determining whether the parties can reach agreement on major terms before definitive agreements are drafted.  But there are substantial drawbacks. One party may use the letter to shop the transaction to third parties, using the offer as a stalking horse.  In some instances, too, the letter itself may be so detailed that it becomes enforceable. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting letters of intent in commercial real estate acquisition and sales, and leasing transactions.   Defining timeframes for negotiations/operative agreements & expiration of letter Core economic terms – purchase price and holdbacks, lease payments, escalator clauses Deposits – hard money v. soft money – and escrow instructions Identifying the property subject to acquisition or lease Other major terms – use, exclusivity, environmental issues, etc. Confidentiality and non-marketing provisions   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/24/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Letters of Intent in Real Estate Transactions

$89.00

Letters of intent in real estate transactions – buying/selling property and leasing – are essential in helping the parties frame areas of agreement, identify areas for further negotiation, and establish a timeline for completing the deal. These letters can also be cost-effective in determining whether the parties can reach agreement on major terms before definitive agreements are drafted.  But there are substantial drawbacks. One party may use the letter to shop the transaction to third parties, using the offer as a stalking horse.  In some instances, too, the letter itself may be so detailed that it becomes enforceable. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting letters of intent in commercial real estate acquisition and sales, and leasing transactions.   Defining timeframes for negotiations/operative agreements & expiration of letter Core economic terms – purchase price and holdbacks, lease payments, escalator clauses Deposits – hard money v. soft money – and escrow instructions Identifying the property subject to acquisition or lease Other major terms – use, exclusivity, environmental issues, etc. Confidentiality and non-marketing provisions   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/24/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Private Placements: Raising Capital from Investors, Part 1

$69.00

Closely held companies raise capital through private placements, an offering of stock or other securities to private investors. Offerings of every size must comply with a dense set of federal securities regulation that require the offering of securities to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission or qualify for an exemption from registration, mostly commonly Regulation D.  Failure to understand the regulatory framework and draft private placement documents exposes the offering company to substantial financial liability. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning private placements, drafting the operative agreements, and understanding the regulatory framework governing them.   Day 1: How private placements are used as a practical matter in capital raises Understanding the securities law and regulatory framework of private placements Reliance on Reg. D safe harbor to avoid registration – amounts raised, accredited investor, timeframes, non-solicitation Understanding exempt securities v. exempt offerings   Day 2: Practical guidance on drafting subscription agreements Understanding disclosures in offering documents and liability for issuer of securities Special issues for small private placements Crowdfunding as a capital raising tool   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Mr. Terry earned his A.B. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Wayne State University.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/25/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Private Placements: Raising Capital from Investors, Part 1

$69.00

Closely held companies raise capital through private placements, an offering of stock or other securities to private investors. Offerings of every size must comply with a dense set of federal securities regulation that require the offering of securities to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission or qualify for an exemption from registration, mostly commonly Regulation D.  Failure to understand the regulatory framework and draft private placement documents exposes the offering company to substantial financial liability. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning private placements, drafting the operative agreements, and understanding the regulatory framework governing them.   Day 1: How private placements are used as a practical matter in capital raises Understanding the securities law and regulatory framework of private placements Reliance on Reg. D safe harbor to avoid registration – amounts raised, accredited investor, timeframes, non-solicitation Understanding exempt securities v. exempt offerings   Day 2: Practical guidance on drafting subscription agreements Understanding disclosures in offering documents and liability for issuer of securities Special issues for small private placements Crowdfunding as a capital raising tool   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Mr. Terry earned his A.B. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Wayne State University.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/25/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Private Placements: Raising Capital from Investors, Part 2

$69.00

Closely held companies raise capital through private placements, an offering of stock or other securities to private investors. Offerings of every size must comply with a dense set of federal securities regulation that require the offering of securities to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission or qualify for an exemption from registration, mostly commonly Regulation D.  Failure to understand the regulatory framework and draft private placement documents exposes the offering company to substantial financial liability. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning private placements, drafting the operative agreements, and understanding the regulatory framework governing them.   Day 1: How private placements are used as a practical matter in capital raises Understanding the securities law and regulatory framework of private placements Reliance on Reg. D safe harbor to avoid registration – amounts raised, accredited investor, timeframes, non-solicitation Understanding exempt securities v. exempt offerings   Day 2: Practical guidance on drafting subscription agreements Understanding disclosures in offering documents and liability for issuer of securities Special issues for small private placements Crowdfunding as a capital raising tool   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Mr. Terry earned his A.B. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Wayne State University.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/26/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Private Placements: Raising Capital from Investors, Part 2

$69.00

Closely held companies raise capital through private placements, an offering of stock or other securities to private investors. Offerings of every size must comply with a dense set of federal securities regulation that require the offering of securities to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission or qualify for an exemption from registration, mostly commonly Regulation D.  Failure to understand the regulatory framework and draft private placement documents exposes the offering company to substantial financial liability. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning private placements, drafting the operative agreements, and understanding the regulatory framework governing them.   Day 1: How private placements are used as a practical matter in capital raises Understanding the securities law and regulatory framework of private placements Reliance on Reg. D safe harbor to avoid registration – amounts raised, accredited investor, timeframes, non-solicitation Understanding exempt securities v. exempt offerings   Day 2: Practical guidance on drafting subscription agreements Understanding disclosures in offering documents and liability for issuer of securities Special issues for small private placements Crowdfunding as a capital raising tool   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Mr. Terry earned his A.B. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Wayne State University.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/26/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE