Course1

LIVE REPLAY: How Ethics Rules Apply to Lawyers Outside of Law Practice

$89.00

Ethics rules are intended primarily to regulate lawyer acts when practicing law. But the rules do not always stop there. Lawyers can be held responsible and disciplined under ethics rules for things they do when acting outside of their practices. Lawyers may be disciplined under ethics rules for criminal conduct, including misdemeanors, entirely unrelated to their lawyerly conduct. They may be also be disciplined for any acts that involve dishonesty, misrepresentation, or any actions prejudicial to the judicial system. This program will provide you with a guide to circumstances in which ethics rules apply to lawyers when they act outside of law practice.   Dishonesty and misrepresentation when a lawyer is acting as a non-lawyer Lawyers as business people – how counter-parties can allege ethical misconduct Self-representation – when lawyers represent themselves in litigation, who can they communicate with? Violations of law, including misdemeanors, as ethics violations Restrictions on lawyers’ ability to market themselves in non-lawyer roles   Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750-page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/10/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Real Estate Finance: Trends and Best Practices, Part 1

$89.00

  This program will provide you with a guide to real estate finance. It will cover the practical aspects of structuring debt, equity, and mezzanine finance.  Major issues and traps in negotiating first mortgages, including personal guarantees and carve-outs, will be discussed in detail. The program will also cover credit enhancement, leasehold finance, and how financing alternatives have changed in a stronger market. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to major issues in negotiating and drafting real estate finance agreements.   Day 1: Major issues of negotiating first mortgages Loan application and bank commitments Role of personal guarantees and negotiating non-recourse carve-outs with lenders Defeasance and prepayment premiums   Day 2: Structuring equity in real estate deals Mezzanine financing and drafting issues Leasehold finance Credit enhancement instruments Single purpose entities for finance purposes   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/11/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Real Estate Finance: Trends and Best Practices, Part 2

$89.00

This program will provide you with a guide to real estate finance. It will cover the practical aspects of structuring debt, equity, and mezzanine finance.  Major issues and traps in negotiating first mortgages, including personal guarantees and carve-outs, will be discussed in detail. The program will also cover credit enhancement, leasehold finance, and how financing alternatives have changed in a stronger market. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to major issues in negotiating and drafting real estate finance agreements.   Day 1: Major issues of negotiating first mortgages Loan application and bank commitments Role of personal guarantees and negotiating non-recourse carve-outs with lenders Defeasance and prepayment premiums   Day 2: Structuring equity in real estate deals Mezzanine financing and drafting issues Leasehold finance Credit enhancement instruments Single purpose entities for finance purposes   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/12/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Equipment Leases: Drafting & UCC Article 2A Issues

$89.00

Many companies lease rather than buy computers and servers, company cars and other capital equipment.  These leases are government by UCC Article 2A, an intricate set of provisions governing their validity, treatment, and enforcement.  If the lease is not properly drafted to comply with the UCC, it risks being re-characterized as a sale or a security interest, which give rise to substantially adverse financial and tax consequences. This program will also provide you with a practical guide to reviewing equipment leases, including spotting red flags and avoiding recharacterization.   Types of equipment leases – “true” leases, synthetic leases, “lease to own” arrangements, and more Spotting red flags of financeable leases – and how to ensure UCC 2A compliance Rights and obligations of the parties – manufacturer, lessor and lessee – and remedies for breach Circumstances leading to re-characterization of a “true lease” as a sale or financing Adverse financial, tax and practical ramifications of lease re-characterization   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/15/2022
    Presented
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Joint Ventures Agreements in Business, Part 1

$89.00

Businesses frequently pool their resources – capital, expertise, marketing, distribution – in joint ventures, leveraging their individual strengths by partnering with companies with complementary strengths. There are many types of JVs – contractual strategic alliances, entity-based ventures, and other hybrid forms – each with its tradeoffs.  JV agreements involve contributions by the parties, allocating management control, access to information, ownership of jointly developed property, dispute resolution, and transfers of interests. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning and drafting joint ventures.   Day 1 – August 16, 2022: Framework of considerations – formality, capital, tax issues, management control, exits Types of joint ventures – contractual strategic alliances v. shared entities v. hybrids Choice of entity – incorporated entities v. LPs and general partnerships v. LLCs Management, access to information, deadlocks and resolution   Day 2 – August 17, 2022: Contributions – capital, marketing and distribution expertise, intangible assets Economics – allocation of profits and losses, and distribution policies Transfers of JV interests – rights of first offer/refusal, restrictions on transfers, dissolution Ownership of jointly developed property – development of intellectual   Speaker: Peter J. Kinsella is a partner in the Denver office of Perkins Coie, LLP, where he has an extensive technology law practice focusing on advising start-up, emerging and large companies on technology-related commercial and intellectual property transaction matters.  Prior to joining his firm, he worked for ten years in various legal capacities with Qwest Communications International, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc.  Mr. Kinsella has extensive experience structuring and negotiating data sharing agreements, complex procurement agreements, product distribution agreements, OEM agreements, marketing and advertising agreements, corporate sponsorship agreements, and various types of patent, trademark and copyright licenses.  Mr. Kinsella received his B.S. from North Dakota State University and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/16/2022
    Presented
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Joint Ventures Agreements in Business, Part 2

$89.00

Businesses frequently pool their resources – capital, expertise, marketing, distribution – in joint ventures, leveraging their individual strengths by partnering with companies with complementary strengths. There are many types of JVs – contractual strategic alliances, entity-based ventures, and other hybrid forms – each with its tradeoffs.  JV agreements involve contributions by the parties, allocating management control, access to information, ownership of jointly developed property, dispute resolution, and transfers of interests. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning and drafting joint ventures.   Day 1 – August 16, 2022: Framework of considerations – formality, capital, tax issues, management control, exits Types of joint ventures – contractual strategic alliances v. shared entities v. hybrids Choice of entity – incorporated entities v. LPs and general partnerships v. LLCs Management, access to information, deadlocks and resolution   Day 2 – August 17, 2022: Contributions – capital, marketing and distribution expertise, intangible assets Economics – allocation of profits and losses, and distribution policies Transfers of JV interests – rights of first offer/refusal, restrictions on transfers, dissolution Ownership of jointly developed property – development of intellectual   Speaker: Peter J. Kinsella is a partner in the Denver office of Perkins Coie, LLP, where he has an extensive technology law practice focusing on advising start-up, emerging and large companies on technology-related commercial and intellectual property transaction matters.  Prior to joining his firm, he worked for ten years in various legal capacities with Qwest Communications International, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc.  Mr. Kinsella has extensive experience structuring and negotiating data sharing agreements, complex procurement agreements, product distribution agreements, OEM agreements, marketing and advertising agreements, corporate sponsorship agreements, and various types of patent, trademark and copyright licenses.  Mr. Kinsella received his B.S. from North Dakota State University and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/17/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Ethics and Conflicts with Clients, Part 1

$89.00

Despite best efforts, lawyers may develop ethical conflicts with their clients.  Sometimes these conflicts may initially seem like positive developments. The lawyer may seek to buy into a client’s business enterprise or participate in a transaction, be offered a gift by a client, or even develop a romantic relationship with a client.  But these and many others come with substantial ethical issues.  Sometimes these conflicts may be more immediately problematic, as when a lawyer leaves a law firm and wants to take his or her clients to the new firm, or when a client refuses to pay legal fees, or worse, as when the lawyer has a duty to disclose certain acts of his or her own malpractice.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to lawyer conflicts with their clients and how to avoid or resolve them. Day 1: Gifts – can lawyers accept from clients? Business – can lawyers go into business with a client? Departure – can lawyers take their clients to a firm? Former clients – what duties does a lawyer have? Day 2: Dishonest clients – what must you do? Lawyers as witnesses – how do you handle the conflict and privilege issues? Clients with diminished capacity – from whom do you take instructions?  What are the other issues? Settlements – what if a client’s tactics are improper? Malpractice – do you have a duty to disclose?   Speakers: William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/18/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Ethics and Conflicts with Clients, Part 2

$89.00

Despite best efforts, lawyers may develop ethical conflicts with their clients.  Sometimes these conflicts may initially seem like positive developments. The lawyer may seek to buy into a client’s business enterprise or participate in a transaction, be offered a gift by a client, or even develop a romantic relationship with a client.  But these and many others come with substantial ethical issues.  Sometimes these conflicts may be more immediately problematic, as when a lawyer leaves a law firm and wants to take his or her clients to the new firm, or when a client refuses to pay legal fees, or worse, as when the lawyer has a duty to disclose certain acts of his or her own malpractice.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to lawyer conflicts with their clients and how to avoid or resolve them. Day 1: Gifts – can lawyers accept from clients? Business – can lawyers go into business with a client? Departure – can lawyers take their clients to a firm? Former clients – what duties does a lawyer have? Day 2: Dishonest clients – what must you do? Lawyers as witnesses – how do you handle the conflict and privilege issues? Clients with diminished capacity – from whom do you take instructions?  What are the other issues? Settlements – what if a client’s tactics are improper? Malpractice – do you have a duty to disclose?   Speaker: William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/19/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Escrow Agreements in Real Estate Transactions

$89.00

Escrow agreements are essential documents in every significant real estate transaction. They are mechanisms for allocating risk among the parties to the transaction.  Escrow agents are charged with determining whether certain contractual conditions are satisfied, thereby triggering the disbursement of money or property. Escrow arrangements mitigate the risk of non-performance by one of the parties.  But escrow agreements are fraught with potential conflicts and traps that may give rise to delays in finally closing a transaction. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting effective escrow agreements, risk allocation, conflict avoidance and working with escrow agents.   Essential terms – property held, conditions for release/disbursement, fees Defining an agent’s duties, authority, and liability Practical problems with escrow arrangements – holding all the documents, breaking escrow, death of party Issues in construction contracts, development transactions, and property sales Letter of credit, tax and bankruptcy issues to consider   Speaker: John S. Hollyfield is of counsel and a former partner in the Houston office Norton Rose Fulbright, LLP.  He has more than 40 years’ experience in real estate law practice.  He formerly served as chair of the ABA Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section, president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, and chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute.  He has been named a "Texas Super Lawyer" in Real Estate Law by Texas Monthly magazine and is listed in Who’s Who in American Law.  He is co-editor of Modern Banking and Lending Forms (4th Edition), published by Warren, Gorham & Lamont.  He received his B.B.A. from the University of Texas and his LL.B. from the University of Texas School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/22/2022
    Presented
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LLC/Partnerships Interests: Collateral, Pledges, and Security Interests

$89.00

LLC members, partners and S Corp shareholders frequently pledge their ownership stakes as collateral to fund their businesses or for personal purposes. Taking and perfecting a security interest in an ownership stake involves a complex set of choices and processes under UCC Article 9 and Article 8, federal securities law and organizational law, each implying risk and limitations on the secured party.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to taking and perfecting a security interest in a partnership, LLC or S Corp ownership stake, the practical remedies and choices available to secured parties on foreclosure, how to circumvent certain restrictions, and the impact of non-UCC law on taking a security interest.   How to take a security interest in partnership, LLC or S Corp ownership stake Relationship of Article 9 and Article 8, defining security interests in securities and investment properties Methods and mistakes in perfecting the security interest Restrictions on assignment and methods to circumvent Rights of secured parties, including the right buy, and foreclose strategies and traps Securities law and non-UCC legal issues   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/23/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Letters of Intent in Real Estate Transactions

$89.00

Letters of intent in real estate transactions – buying/selling property and leasing – are essential in helping the parties frame areas of agreement, identify areas for further negotiation, and establish a timeline for completing the deal. These letters can also be cost-effective in determining whether the parties can reach agreement on major terms before definitive agreements are drafted.  But there are substantial drawbacks. One party may use the letter to shop the transaction to third parties, using the offer as a stalking horse.  In some instances, too, the letter itself may be so detailed that it becomes enforceable. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting letters of intent in commercial real estate acquisition and sales, and leasing transactions.   Defining timeframes for negotiations/operative agreements & expiration of letter Core economic terms – purchase price and holdbacks, lease payments, escalator clauses Deposits – hard money v. soft money – and escrow instructions Identifying the property subject to acquisition or lease Other major terms – use, exclusivity, environmental issues, etc. Confidentiality and non-marketing provisions   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/24/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Private Placements: Raising Capital from Investors, Part 1

$69.00

Closely held companies raise capital through private placements, an offering of stock or other securities to private investors. Offerings of every size must comply with a dense set of federal securities regulation that require the offering of securities to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission or qualify for an exemption from registration, mostly commonly Regulation D.  Failure to understand the regulatory framework and draft private placement documents exposes the offering company to substantial financial liability. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning private placements, drafting the operative agreements, and understanding the regulatory framework governing them.   Day 1: How private placements are used as a practical matter in capital raises Understanding the securities law and regulatory framework of private placements Reliance on Reg. D safe harbor to avoid registration – amounts raised, accredited investor, timeframes, non-solicitation Understanding exempt securities v. exempt offerings   Day 2: Practical guidance on drafting subscription agreements Understanding disclosures in offering documents and liability for issuer of securities Special issues for small private placements Crowdfunding as a capital raising tool   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Mr. Terry earned his A.B. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Wayne State University.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/25/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Private Placements: Raising Capital from Investors, Part 2

$69.00

Closely held companies raise capital through private placements, an offering of stock or other securities to private investors. Offerings of every size must comply with a dense set of federal securities regulation that require the offering of securities to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission or qualify for an exemption from registration, mostly commonly Regulation D.  Failure to understand the regulatory framework and draft private placement documents exposes the offering company to substantial financial liability. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning private placements, drafting the operative agreements, and understanding the regulatory framework governing them.   Day 1: How private placements are used as a practical matter in capital raises Understanding the securities law and regulatory framework of private placements Reliance on Reg. D safe harbor to avoid registration – amounts raised, accredited investor, timeframes, non-solicitation Understanding exempt securities v. exempt offerings   Day 2: Practical guidance on drafting subscription agreements Understanding disclosures in offering documents and liability for issuer of securities Special issues for small private placements Crowdfunding as a capital raising tool   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Mr. Terry earned his A.B. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Wayne State University.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/26/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Ethics & Artifcial Intelligence: What Lawyers Should Know

$89.00

The use of artificial intelligence is not some distant prospect.  Many of the tools lawyers use today – online research platforms that suggest other areas for research, software packages that help complete forms or propose or assemble language, and discovery tools that sort through documents – are driven by artificial intelligence. These and other AI engineered legal tools raise substantial ethical issues. Are they the unauthorized practice of law? Have lawyers researched their capabilities such that they are competent to use them? How must lawyers supervise their use by non-lawyer staff?  This program will provide you with a guide to ethics issues when using software and other technology tools based on AI in law practice.   What duties do lawyers have to investigate and understand AI in the tools they use? Does AI constitute the unauthorized practice of law (UPL) in a state? Do software packages that draft language and assemble forms violate ethics rules? What supervisory and training obligations do lawyers have for non-lawyer staff using these tools? Are there ethics concerns of using AI in discovery? Must lawyers warn clients that they use AI?   Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/29/2022
    Presented
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Choice of Entity for Nonprofits & Obtaining Tax Exempt Status, Part 1

$89.00

Counseling a client about choice of entity for a nonprofit or charitable enterprise is a multilayered process.  First, clients need to understand that not all nonprofits are charities. Even if the enterprise is nonprofit and charitable in nature that does not necessarily mean the enterprise is eligible for tax-exempt status. Once these distinctions are made, attorneys need to counsel clients about the subtle advantages and disadvantages of four major types of entities, all formed under state law. Second, there is the distinct issue of how that entity is classified for federal tax purposes. Each classification comes with its own subtle tradeoffs.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to non-profit choice of entity and obtaining tax-exempt status.    Day 1 – August 30, 2022: Framework of major choice of entity considerations for nonprofit and charitable organizations – corporations, LLCs and trusts Private foundations v. public charities – tradeoffs, costs, compliance Restrictions on the activities and investments of each type of entity, including joint ventures with profit-making organizations   Day 2 – August 31, 2022: Considerations involving joint ventures between for-profit and non-profit entities Practical Process of obtaining tax-exempt status – eligibility, timelines, and costs Counseling clients about ongoing compliance reporting   Speaker: Michael Lehmann is a partner in the New York office of Dechert, LLP, where he specializes in tax issues related to non-profits and in the tax treatment of cross-border transactions.  He advises hospitals and other health care providers, research organizations, low-income housing developers, trade associations, private foundations and arts organizations.He advises clients on obtaining and maintaining tax-exempt status, executive compensation, reorganizations and joint ventures, acquisitions, and unrelated business income planning.Mr. Lehmann received his A.B., magna cum laude, from Brown University, his J.D. from Columbia Law School, and his LL.M. from New York University School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/30/2022
    Presented
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Choice of Entity for Nonprofits & Obtaining Tax Exempt Status, Part 2

$89.00

Counseling a client about choice of entity for a nonprofit or charitable enterprise is a multilayered process.  First, clients need to understand that not all nonprofits are charities. Even if the enterprise is nonprofit and charitable in nature that does not necessarily mean the enterprise is eligible for tax-exempt status. Once these distinctions are made, attorneys need to counsel clients about the subtle advantages and disadvantages of four major types of entities, all formed under state law. Second, there is the distinct issue of how that entity is classified for federal tax purposes. Each classification comes with its own subtle tradeoffs.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to non-profit choice of entity and obtaining tax-exempt status.    Day 1 – August 30, 2022: Framework of major choice of entity considerations for nonprofit and charitable organizations – corporations, LLCs and trusts Private foundations v. public charities – tradeoffs, costs, compliance Restrictions on the activities and investments of each type of entity, including joint ventures with profit-making organizations   Day 2 – August 31, 2022: Considerations involving joint ventures between for-profit and non-profit entities Practical Process of obtaining tax-exempt status – eligibility, timelines, and costs Counseling clients about ongoing compliance reporting   Speaker: Michael Lehmann is a partner in the New York office of Dechert, LLP, where he specializes in tax issues related to non-profits and in the tax treatment of cross-border transactions.  He advises hospitals and other health care providers, research organizations, low-income housing developers, trade associations, private foundations and arts organizations.He advises clients on obtaining and maintaining tax-exempt status, executive compensation, reorganizations and joint ventures, acquisitions, and unrelated business income planning.Mr. Lehmann received his A.B., magna cum laude, from Brown University, his J.D. from Columbia Law School, and his LL.M. from New York University School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/31/2022
    Presented
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Parking: Special Issues in Commercial Leases

$89.00

The right of tenants – and their employees and customers – to park can be one of the most important elements of office and retail leases.  Physical space is often sparse and expensive, making parking spots even more dear. Tenants want absolute rights to parking and to ensure attendant services – e.g., snow removal, maintenance, etc. – while landlords want maximum flexibility, including the right to reclaim spots.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to spotting parking issues in commercial leases, and negotiating effective rights for your clients.    Demised spaces v. rights to park Types of rights to park – general rights v. exclusive rights Issues for lots v. parking garages Duties to patrol employee use of parking spots Economic issues for landlords and tenants, including CAM Parking as zoning issue – ratio of office/retail space to parking spots Reclamation of parking spots by landlord for later development   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/1/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Ethics of Identifying Your Client: It's Not Always Easy

$89.00

The first step in every ethics analysis is answering the question, who is your client?  It’s seemingly a very easy question to answer, but it’s not always 20/20 except in hindsight.  Representing multiple parties on the same matter, whether in litigation or on a transaction, may mean you have many clients, some or all with conflicts.   If you’re a private practitioner and you represent an organization, your client may be the entity, its officers from whom you are taking directions, or possibly both. If you’re an in-house attorney, the analysis – and its implications for the attorney-client privilege – becomes even more complex.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethics of identifying your client in a variety of settings avoiding conflicts of interest with the client.  Ethics and identifying your client and avoiding conflicts in transactions and litigation Representing businesses entities, nonprofit associations, and the government – client v. person giving directions Identifying clients in trust and estate planning – the testator or the person paying your fees? Special ethical challenges and ethical risks for in-house counsel and attorney-client privilege issues How to untangle clients and conflicts in joint representations – managing conflicts and information flows Best practices in documenting client representation to avoid later challenge   Speakers: Elizabeth Treubert Simon is an ethics attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, where she advises on a wide range of ethics and compliance-related matters to support Akin Gump’s offices worldwide.  Previously, she practiced law in Washington DC and New York, focusing on business and commercial litigation and providing counsel to clients regarding professional ethics and attorney disciplinary procedures.  She is a member of the New York State Bar Association Committee on Professional Discipline and the District of Columbia Legal Ethics Committee.  She writes and speaks extensively on attorney ethics issues.   She received her B.A. and M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania and her J.D. from Albany Law School.   Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/2/2022
    Presented
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Reps and Warranties in Business Transactions

$89.00

Representations and warranties are a marquee feature of virtually every significant transaction.  Parties often conduct extensive due diligence but want specific assurances about important facts about which only the company would have the best information. These facts – e.g., the absence of liabilities or the presence of certain authorizations – can be few or great in number, and they vary according to the facts of the transaction. They are essential to most transactions. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to the differences between reps and warranties, the types and their remedies, and drafting.   Differences between reps and warranties, and their remedies Relationship between diligence and reps and warranties – and what the law says about how one impacts the other Reps and warranties concerning tangible and intangible property – title, taxes, transfer restrictions Provisions covering revenue projections, financial statements, and customer lists Understanding the limits of reps and warranties – what you can ask for, what you can get   Speaker: C. Ben Huber is a partner in the Denver office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where he has a broad transactional practice encompassing mergers and acquisitions, restructurings and reorganizations, corporate finance, capital markets, venture funds, commercial transactions and general corporate law.  He also has substantial experience as counsel to high tech, biotech and software companies in the development, protection and licensing of intellectual property.  His clients include start-up companies, family- and other closely-held businesses, middle market business, Fortune 500 companies, venture funds and institutional investors.  Mr. Huber earned his B.A. from the University of Colorado and his J.D. at the University of Colorado Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/6/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: 2022 Ethics in Litigation Update, Part 1

$89.00

This annual ethics update will cover a wide range of ethical developments important to your civil litigation practice.  The program will provide detailed coverage of developments in conflicts of interest in litigation, confidentiality and the attorney-client privilege, and ethics in defense and common interest agreements.  The program will provide a wide-ranging discussion of the ethical issues that arise with the spread, use and development of technology in litigation.  Also, the panel will discuss ethical issues in discovery of digital files, records, and communications.  Please join for this annual program which will provide you with a lively discussion of ethical developments important to civil litigation practice.    Day 1: Ethics and discovery Ethics and preparing witnesses – the limits of coaching Recent developments in conflicts of interest, part 1   Day 2: Annual technology review – the many ways in which technology can cause ethical traps for lawyers in litigation Client confidentiality, the attorney-client privilege, and work product doctrine Recent developments in conflicts of interest, part 2   Speakers: Lucian T. Pera is a partner in the Memphis office of Adams & Reese, LLP.  His practice includes professional malpractice litigation as well as counseling lawyers and law firms in the area of ethics and professional responsibility.  He was a member of the ABA’s Ethics 2000 Commission and is co-author of "Ethics and Lawyering Today," a national e-mail newsletter on lawyer ethics, which is accessible at: www.ethicsandlawyering.com.  He is the immediate past Treasurer of the ABA and currently serves as Vice President of the Tennessee Bar Association.  Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Harry W. Wellford of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.  Mr. Pera received his A.B. with honors from Princeton University and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law.  William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com <http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/7/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: 2022 Ethics in Litigation Update, Part 2

$89.00

This annual ethics update will cover a wide range of ethical developments important to your civil litigation practice.  The program will provide detailed coverage of developments in conflicts of interest in litigation, confidentiality and the attorney-client privilege, and ethics in defense and common interest agreements.  The program will provide a wide-ranging discussion of the ethical issues that arise with the spread, use and development of technology in litigation.  Also, the panel will discuss ethical issues in discovery of digital files, records, and communications.  Please join for this annual program which will provide you with a lively discussion of ethical developments important to civil litigation practice.    Day 1: Ethics and discovery Ethics and preparing witnesses – the limits of coaching Recent developments in conflicts of interest, part 1   Day 2: Annual technology review – the many ways in which technology can cause ethical traps for lawyers in litigation Client confidentiality, the attorney-client privilege, and work product doctrine Recent developments in conflicts of interest, part 2   Speakers: Lucian T. Pera is a partner in the Memphis office of Adams & Reese, LLP.  His practice includes professional malpractice litigation as well as counseling lawyers and law firms in the area of ethics and professional responsibility.  He was a member of the ABA’s Ethics 2000 Commission and is co-author of "Ethics and Lawyering Today," a national e-mail newsletter on lawyer ethics, which is accessible at: www.ethicsandlawyering.com.  He is the immediate past Treasurer of the ABA and currently serves as Vice President of the Tennessee Bar Association.  Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Harry W. Wellford of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.  Mr. Pera received his A.B. with honors from Princeton University and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com <http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/8/2022
    Presented
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Drafting Wills & Trust Documents to Reduce Risks of Challenge

$89.00

A last will and testament is not always the final word of a testator. Wills frequently trigger long-suppressed family rivalries and resentments. With the testator no longer on the scene, children or other heirs are freed to express their resentments. These resentments often worsen when the will’s plan for allocating of money, valuable property or sentimental items is made known, leading to dispute and litigation. These disputes can be very time-consuming and costly resolve, sharply diminishing the value of an estate. This program will discuss grounds for will contests and practical steps lawyers and their clients can take to avoid challenge.   Spotting red flags in will contests – disinheriting close family members, unequal treatment of children, unusual behavior of testator & more Sources of law in will contests – grounds for challenging wills Practical steps to avoid will contests – will ceremonies, videotaped testaments, witness selection, affidavits Use of In Terrorem provisions to prevent will contests Issues surrounding holographic wills and other informal wills   Speaker:  Steven B. Malech is partner in the New York City office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where he is chair of the firm’s probate litigation practice group.  He is represents beneficiaries, fiduciaries and creditors in disputes involving alleged violations of the Prudent Investor Act and its predecessors, alleged breaches of fiduciary duty, disputed accountings, and will contests. He represents clients in cutting edge probate litigation matters involving trusts and estates with assets in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Mr. Malech received his B.A., with special honors, from the University of Texas and his J.D. from the Connecticut School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/9/2022
    Presented
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Domestic Self-Settled Trusts

$89.00

In recent years, many states have begun to allow self-settled spendthrift trusts. These new trusts allow the settlor to obtain the benefits of offshore asset protection trusts without the complexity, cost, and byzantine application of foreign law. A settlor can shield assets from his or her creditors or tort claimants, remove those assets from his or her gross estate, and obtain other tax and non-tax benefits.Though more accessible than offshore trusts, domestic asset protection trusts still come with risk. This program will provide you with a practical guide to using self-settled spendthrift trusts and drafting their instruments.     What are domestic asset protection trusts? When are they best used and what are the risks? What states allow these trusts and subject to what limits? How do domestic trusts and offshore trust compare? What are the tax benefits and risks of thee trusts?   Speakers: Jonathan E. Gopman is a partner with Akerman, LLP in Naples, Florida and chair of the firm’s trust and estate group. His practice focuses on sophisticated wealth accumulation and preservation planning strategies for entrepreneurs.  He is a Fellow of the American College of Tax Counsel and co-author of the revised version of the BNA Tax Management Portfolio “Estate Tax Payments and Liabilities.”  He is also a commentator on asset protection planning matters for Leimberg Information Services, Inc., a member of the legal advisory board of Commonwealth Trust Company in Wilmington, Delaware, and a member of the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners. Mr. Gopman received his B.A. from the University of South Florida, his J.D. from Florida State University College of Law, and his LL.M. from the University of Miami.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/12/2022
    Presented
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Special Lease Issues for Medical/Dental Offices

$89.00

Leased Medical office space is now larger than industrial and nearly as large as retail leasing. These encompass primary medical and dental care practice, specialized surgical hospitals, long-term acute care facilities, community clinics, and health and wellness facilities.  All of these come with special leasing issues, including the creation and disposal of medical or hazardous waste, the installation of specialized equipment, additional regulatory compliance requirements associated with health care, and even patient privacy issues.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to special issues in drafting for medical and dental office space.    Types of medical properties and how leasing issues differ for each Medical offices in space not specifically designed for medical services Generation and disposal and medical and hazardous waste Accessibility issues and compliance with medical care regulations Landlord right of entry/patient privacy issues Installation of special medical/dental equipment and waiver of liens Special electricity needs and continuity of service   Speakers:  John S. Hollyfield is of counsel and a former partner in the Houston office Norton Rose Fulbright, LLP.  He has more than 40 years’ experience in real estate law practice.  He formerly served as chair of the ABA Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section, president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, and chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute.  He has been named a "Texas Super Lawyer" in Real Estate Law by Texas Monthly magazine and is listed in Who’s Who in American Law.  He is co-editor of Modern Banking and Lending Forms (4th Edition), published by Warren, Gorham & Lamont.  He received his B.B.A. from the University of Texas and his LL.B. from the University of Texas School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/13/2022
    Presented
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Ethics for Business Lawyers

$89.00

Lawyers advising businesses on transactions or negotiating on their behalf often confront a range of important ethical questions.  The biggest is, who is your client?  Often a company’s owners or managers will not understand the distinction between representing them and representing the company? There are also issues of identifying and clearing conflicts among clients when they are negotiating transaction.  And what can a lawyer say or do when negotiating for a client? Also, lawyers are sometimes confronted with issues about what to do when clients are dishonest.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethical issues when representing clients in business transactions.    Ethical issues in business and corporate practice Identifying your client in a variety of transactional contexts – the company v. its managers? Conflicts of interest in representing both sides of a transaction Ethical issues in transactional negotiations and communications with represented parties Representing clients you know to be dishonest and reporting wrong-doing “up and out”   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Website“Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com<http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/14/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Drafting Employment Agreements, Part 1

$89.00

This program will provide you a practical guide to the most important provisions of employment agreements, common sources of dispute and litigation, and traps. The program will cover scope of duties (and how they may change over time), forms of compensation and benefits (including deferred compensation), and objective/measurable performance standards.  The program will also discuss planning for the possible release of the employee, limiting liability, and protecting confidential information and trade secrets to which the employee may have had access. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting successful employment agreements.   Day 1: Scope of an employee’s duties and modification as facts and circumstances change Objective and measurable performance benchmarks tied to incentive compensation Forms of compensation, deferred compensation, and fringe benefits Protecting trade secrets – non-competition and non-disclosure mechanisms   Day 2: Term of employment – fixed or variable terms, extensions, and discharge Anticipating severance and building in dispute mitigation and resolution provisions Severance benefits on voluntary and involuntary separation – and tying them to confidentiality and non-competition Non-disparagement of employer on discharge or voluntary departure Essential mediation and choice of law considerations   Speaker:  Jerrold F. Goldberg is a partner in the New York City office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where co-chairs the firm’s labor and employment practice group and he has more than 35 years’ experience practicing in virtually all aspects of labor and employment.  His expertise includes employee leave under federal and state law, traditional labor/union-management issues, employment discrimination, executive employment, severance agreements and wage and hour laws.  He represents clients before the EEOC, the FRLB, and federal and state courts.  Mr. Goldberg received his B.S. from Cornell University and his J.D. from New York University School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/15/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Drafting Employment Agreements, Part 2

$89.00

This program will provide you a practical guide to the most important provisions of employment agreements, common sources of dispute and litigation, and traps. The program will cover scope of duties (and how they may change over time), forms of compensation and benefits (including deferred compensation), and objective/measurable performance standards.  The program will also discuss planning for the possible release of the employee, limiting liability, and protecting confidential information and trade secrets to which the employee may have had access. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting successful employment agreements.   Day 1: Scope of an employee’s duties and modification as facts and circumstances change Objective and measurable performance benchmarks tied to incentive compensation Forms of compensation, deferred compensation, and fringe benefits Protecting trade secrets – non-competition and non-disclosure mechanisms   Day 2: Term of employment – fixed or variable terms, extensions, and discharge Anticipating severance and building in dispute mitigation and resolution provisions Severance benefits on voluntary and involuntary separation – and tying them to confidentiality and non-competition Non-disparagement of employer on discharge or voluntary departure Essential mediation and choice of law considerations   Speaker: Jerrold F. Goldberg is a partner in the New York City office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where co-chairs the firm’s labor and employment practice group and he has more than 35 years’ experience practicing in virtually all aspects of labor and employment.  His expertise includes employee leave under federal and state law, traditional labor/union-management issues, employment discrimination, executive employment, severance agreements and wage and hour laws.  He represents clients before the EEOC, the FRLB, and federal and state courts.  Mr. Goldberg received his B.S. from Cornell University and his J.D. from New York University School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/16/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Professionalism for the Ethical Lawyer

$89.00

Ethics rules, the principles of professionalism, and sanctionable conduct are interrelated.  Lawyers have a duty to zealously represent their clients, but they do not have a duty to engage in offensive conduct that may be desired by clients. Lawyers have duties of confidentiality and honesty, but those duties do not always require pressing every advantage, such as when the lawyer knows that opposing counsel has made a material drafting error in a transactional document. In these and many other scenarios, ethics rules, professionalism, and potentially sanctionable conduct subtly interact.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to professionalism for the ethical lawyer.    Interrelationship of ethics rules, professionalism, and sanctions Zealous representation v. needlessly embarrassing an adversary or third-party Reacting to an adversary’s drafting errors in transactional documents Ethics, professionalism, and inadvertent transmission of communications Duty to supervise and train subordinate lawyers and staff, including to ensure courtesy to clients, opposing counsel, and courts Offering candid advice to clients and withdrawal when they demand offensive conduct Avoiding discrimination and bigotry   Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the Tysons Corners, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, where he advises firm clients on professional responsibility issues and properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  He has served on the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility, and is a Member of the American Law Institute and a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation.  He has written extensively on attorney-client privilege, ethics and other topics, and has spoken at over 1,800 CLE programs throughout the U.S. and in several foreign countries.  Through links on his website biography, he has made available to the public his summaries of over 1,600 Virginia and ABA legal ethics opinions, organized by topic; a 300 page summary of his two-volume 1,500 page book on the attorney-client privilege and work product doctrine; over 900 weekly email alerts about privilege and work product cases; and materials for 40 ethics programs on numerous topics, totaling over 9,000 pages of analysis.  Mr. Spahn graduated magna cum laude from Yale University and received his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/19/2022
    Presented
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Defending Against IRS Audits of Closely Held Companies, Part 1

$89.00

This program will provide you with a practical guide to defending closely held businesses and owners against IRS audits and collection activity. The program will discuss counseling clients about what to expect in the process and preparing their documentation for review.  It will also cover assessing their potential liability and preparing strategies accordingly.  The differences between income and employment tax issues will also be covered. This program will provide you with real world guide to defending against IRS audit and collection activity of closely held companies.    Day 1 September 20, 2022: Ascertaining the IRS’s goals and determining a reasonable range of settlements Types of settlements and IRS settlement standards Appeals process and rates of success at each level Negotiating an audit settlement in anticipation of collections Collections process, defenses, and forms of penalty   Day 2 September 21, 2022: Counseling clients about the scope and nature of IRS collection activity IRS use of asset freezes – cash and liquid assets Liens and levies – and how to obtain releases Obtaining injunctive relief from collection activity Interrelationship of bankruptcy law and collection activity   Speakers: Stephen J. Turanchik is an attorney in the Los Angeles office of Paul Hastings, LLP, where his practice focuses on tax litigation at the state and federal levels as well as tax controversy work at the administrative levels. Before entering private practice, he is previously litigated for six years for the U.S. Department of Justice, Tax Division, where he litigated over 300 tax cases in federal, bankruptcy, state and probate court. He has also lectured at Loyola Law School and California State University, Fullerton on topics relating to tax litigation and is chair-elect of the executive committee of the Los Angeles Bar Association’s Tax Section. Mr. Turanchik received his B.A. from the College of the Holy Cross, his J.D. from Fordham University School of Law, and his LL.M. in Taxation from New York University School of Law. Lydia Turanchik is a partner in the Los Angeles office of Nardiello Turanchik, LLP, where her practice focuses on tax litigation and controversy matters against the United States Department of Justice, the Internal Revenue Service, and state tax agencies.  She has handled tax disputes at all levels, including audit, appeal, settlement, litigation and collection.  Before entering private practice, she was a trial attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Tax Division in Washington, D.C.  Ms. Turanchik earned her B.A. from Tufts University, J.D. from Vermont Law School, and her LL.M. from Boston University.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/20/2022
    Presented
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Defending Against IRS Audits of Closely Held Companies, Part 2

$89.00

This program will provide you with a practical guide to defending closely held businesses and owners against IRS audits and collection activity. The program will discuss counseling clients about what to expect in the process and preparing their documentation for review.  It will also cover assessing their potential liability and preparing strategies accordingly.  The differences between income and employment tax issues will also be covered. This program will provide you with real world guide to defending against IRS audit and collection activity of closely held companies.    Day 1 September 20, 2022: Ascertaining the IRS’s goals and determining a reasonable range of settlements Types of settlements and IRS settlement standards Appeals process and rates of success at each level Negotiating an audit settlement in anticipation of collections Collections process, defenses, and forms of penalty   Day 2 September 21, 2022: Counseling clients about the scope and nature of IRS collection activity IRS use of asset freezes – cash and liquid assets Liens and levies – and how to obtain releases Obtaining injunctive relief from collection activity Interrelationship of bankruptcy law and collection activity   Speakers: Stephen J. Turanchik is an attorney in the Los Angeles office of Paul Hastings, LLP, where his practice focuses on tax litigation at the state and federal levels as well as tax controversy work at the administrative levels. Before entering private practice, he is previously litigated for six years for the U.S. Department of Justice, Tax Division, where he litigated over 300 tax cases in federal, bankruptcy, state and probate court. He has also lectured at Loyola Law School and California State University, Fullerton on topics relating to tax litigation and is chair-elect of the executive committee of the Los Angeles Bar Association’s Tax Section. Mr. Turanchik received his B.A. from the College of the Holy Cross, his J.D. from Fordham University School of Law, and his LL.M. in Taxation from New York University School of Law. Lydia Turanchik is a partner in the Los Angeles office of Nardiello Turanchik, LLP, where her practice focuses on tax litigation and controversy matters against the United States Department of Justice, the Internal Revenue Service, and state tax agencies.  She has handled tax disputes at all levels, including audit, appeal, settlement, litigation and collection.  Before entering private practice, she was a trial attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Tax Division in Washington, D.C.  Ms. Turanchik earned her B.A. from Tufts University, J.D. from Vermont Law School, and her LL.M. from Boston University.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/21/2022
    Presented
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